Dunbrody Famine Ship

Since we are living in the Sunny South East of Ireland, whenever we think about trips to nearby locations one always comes to mind: The Dunbrody Famine Ship.

The original was built in Quebec in 1845. It only took 6 months to built and its future captain, John Baldwin, supervised the building of it. Dunbrody was intended to serve as a cargo vessel, however…

It was during that year that the potato crops failed and the food prices went way up — Great Hunger had hit Ireland. About a million people died during this period — the Great Famine. Another million people left the country between 1845 and 1852. There weren’t enough boats to transport all the people, though. That’s why on many of the cargo ships bunks were installed so they could carry passengers instead. Between 160 and 300 people were on board these ships. The Dunbrody broke the record, though. On its way to Quebec it carried 313 passengers.

The tour of the Famine Ship begins in a building next to it. Guided through an area filled with information panels, the history and the making of the Dunbrody is explained to the visitors. Next a short film reveals what it must have felt like to live in Ireland during that time and how desperately the people wanted to flee from these circumstances. The tour guide then explains a few things and the visitors are lead through a short hallway and unto the ship.

There is more to learn on board. Many bits and pieces from that era can be seen and touched. The tour starts on deck and continues below deck where some of the visitors can sit at the tables, while others may sit on the wooden bunk beds. The highlight is when the two actresses appear and — through their testimonies — take the people back into the 19th century…

dunbrody-acting-1               dunbrody-acting-2

About Carmen W.

I'm a helpmate, homemaker, mom, and writer, who was born and raised in Germany but is now living in Ireland. I love to study, read and write about the Christian faith, homemaking, home education, music, and dog training.
This entry was posted in Events/Locations and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.